Sh. Mahnoud Andrade Ibrahim al Amreeki provides the reader with an intimate portrait of America's largest and most significant Islamic Revivalist effort to date. Despite the many attempts to paint the Dar ul Islam Movement (1962-1983) as a militant or radical Islamist organization, Sh. Mahmoud uses his personal life as a vehicle to describe a  community of American Muslims, Black and Latino and their efforts to practice a way of life brought to the shores of America by the greed and lusts of European and American slavers between 1560 and 1865. The history of this Islam as described by Sh. Mahmoud is  as  'American as apple pie'.

Sh. Mahnoud Andrade Ibrahim al Amreeki provides the reader with an intimate portrait of America's largest and most significant Islamic Revivalist effort to date. Despite the many attempts to paint the Dar ul Islam Movement (1962-1983) as a militant or radical Islamist organization, Sh. Mahmoud uses his personal life as a vehicle to describe a  community of American Muslims, Black and Latino and their efforts to practice a way of life brought to the shores of America by the greed and lusts of European and American slavers between 1560 and 1865. The history of this Islam as described by Sh. Mahmoud is  as  'American as apple pie'.

  This seminal work by Dr. Kamal Hassan Ali is rooted in his personal involvement with the largest indigenous effort to promote the religious and social remedies of Islam in America.  Brooklyn, New York in early 1970 is where Dr. Ali pledged himself to the principles of the Dar ul Islam Movement, a national Sunni religious movement whose aim was to familiarize the American people with the precepts of the religion of Islam.     Dr. Kamal Hassan Ali was very instrumental is forwarding the Movement's educational goals and in contributing to the New York State Prison program established by the Dar ul Islam Muslim Prison Committee.    With respect to the Movement's legitimate claim as an indigenous revivalist movement, Dr. Ali methodically sifts through the  five major responsibilities or Pillars of Islam and demonstrates how this Movement, peopled by mostly African American converts, satisfied the communal obligations to these pillars and by doing so, situates the Movement in the center of the global Islamic experience.

This seminal work by Dr. Kamal Hassan Ali is rooted in his personal involvement with the largest indigenous effort to promote the religious and social remedies of Islam in America.  Brooklyn, New York in early 1970 is where Dr. Ali pledged himself to the principles of the Dar ul Islam Movement, a national Sunni religious movement whose aim was to familiarize the American people with the precepts of the religion of Islam. 

Dr. Kamal Hassan Ali was very instrumental is forwarding the Movement's educational goals and in contributing to the New York State Prison program established by the Dar ul Islam Muslim Prison Committee.

With respect to the Movement's legitimate claim as an indigenous revivalist movement, Dr. Ali methodically sifts through the  five major responsibilities or Pillars of Islam and demonstrates how this Movement, peopled by mostly African American converts, satisfied the communal obligations to these pillars and by doing so, situates the Movement in the center of the global Islamic experience.

 

 

Also see The Dar ul Islam Collection